Quiz: In a collision where no one is injured

This Ontario G1 practice test has been prepared to inform you of the basic knowledge and skills necessary for the safe operation of a motor vehicle.

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If you have to inform the police after a non-injury collision, you should provide them with…?
All of these
Your name and address
Proof of insurance
Permit number and vehicle plate

Correct!

Wrong!

If you are involved in a collision where nobody is injured, you should…?
Get the vehicles off the road if possible
Refuse to give your details
Inform the police automatically
Drive on as soon as possible

Correct!

Wrong!

Giving your information to any other party involved in a collision is…?
A legal requirement
Optional
Unwise
Not recommended

Correct!

Wrong!

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What Do I Do In A Collision Where No One Is Hurt?

If you get into a crash with no injuries, follow these steps:



  • If you can still drive your vehicle, get it off of the road so it doesn’t impede the flow of traffic. This is especially important on busy roads or roads with high speed limits. As a rule of thumb, if you can “steer it, clear it.” If you can’t move your car off the road, set up flares or place warning signs far enough away that traffic can slow down or stop to avoid your vehicle.
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  • Call the police. By law, you must notify the authorities about any collision that causes more than $2,000 of damage to property or vehicles. You must also report any collision that causes an injury. If there’s any doubt, give the police a call. Depending on where you are, you should contact either the provincial or the local police.
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  • Auto CollisionDo your best to help both the authorities and anyone else whose vehicle has been damaged. The police will want to know your name and address, the name and address of the registered owner of the vehicle you were in, the vehicle plate and permit number, and the information on your liability insurance card. Have this information ready and give it to the police when prompted.
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  • Record the names, addresses, and contact information of all witnesses.
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  • If the damage caused is less than $2,000, you still need to exchange information with anyone whose vehicle was damaged in the collision. You do not, however, have to report the accident to the police.
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  • When it’s safe, try to get pictures of the scene of the accident and the condition of all involved vehicles with a cell phone or other camera.
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  • If your vehicle is towed, write down the name and license number of the towing company. Be sure to understand where your vehicle is being towed.
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  • As soon as possible, get in touch with your insurance company. This is especially important if you intend to make a claim, as they might want you to provide information about the crash. The longer you wait, the worse your recall will be.